Osx Usb Creator

  
  1. Linux Usb Creator Download
  2. Os X Usb Creator For Windows
  3. Osx Usb Creator Download
  1. Step 3: Now open a Finder window and locate your DMG file. Drag and drop it under the drive names in the Disk Utility app. Step 4: Select the file, and then click on 'Burn' in the same window. In the popup that appears, select your destination drive, which is the USB flash drive you want to burn the DMG file to. Click 'Burn' in the popup window.
  2. Step 2: Prepare the USB Drive. To create a macOS Sierra USB installer, you’ll need a USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 drive with a capacity of at least 8GB. The process of creating the USB installer deletes all data on the USB drive, so make sure it doesn’t contain any important files. With your USB drive connected to your Mac, launch the Disk Utility app.

These advanced steps are primarily for system administrators and others who are familiar with the command line. You don't need a bootable installer to upgrade macOS or reinstall macOS, but it can be useful when you want to install on multiple computers without downloading the installer each time.

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Once you’ve created the drive, now you can boot up into your Linux Live USB. Reboot your Mac with the USB drive plugged in. Hold down the “Option/Alt” key while the computer reboots. This will launch the Startup Manager which allows the user to select a startup disk. Select your USB drive from the menu and boot. If your USB drive doesn't show up, reformat it as FAT32. If you used the 'USB Drive' install mode: After rebooting, boot from the USB drive. On PCs, this usually involves pressing a button such as Esc or F12 immediately after you turn on your computer, while on Macs, you should hold the Option key before OSX boots. A USB flash drive or other secondary volume formatted as Mac OS Extended, with at least 14GB of available storage; A downloaded installer for macOS Big Sur, Catalina, Mojave, High Sierra, or El Capitan.

What you need to create a bootable installer

  • A USB flash drive or other secondary volume formatted as Mac OS Extended, with at least 14GB of available storage
  • A downloaded installer for macOS Big Sur, Catalina, Mojave, High Sierra, or El Capitan

Download macOS

  • Download: macOS Big Sur, macOS Catalina, macOS Mojave, or macOS High Sierra
    These download to your Applications folder as an app named Install macOS [version name]. If the installer opens after downloading, quit it without continuing installation. To get the correct installer, download from a Mac that is using macOS Sierra 10.12.5 or later, or El Capitan 10.11.6. Enterprise administrators, please download from Apple, not a locally hosted software-update server.
  • Download: OS X El Capitan
    This downloads as a disk image named InstallMacOSX.dmg. On a Mac that is compatible with El Capitan, open the disk image and run the installer within, named InstallMacOSX.pkg. It installs an app named Install OS X El Capitan into your Applications folder. You will create the bootable installer from this app, not from the disk image or .pkg installer.

Use the 'createinstallmedia' command in Terminal

  1. Connect the USB flash drive or other volume that you're using for the bootable installer.
  2. Open Terminal, which is in the Utilities folder of your Applications folder.
  3. Type or paste one of the following commands in Terminal. These assume that the installer is in your Applications folder, and MyVolume is the name of the USB flash drive or other volume you're using. If it has a different name, replace MyVolume in these commands with the name of your volume.

Big Sur:*

Catalina:*

Mojave:*

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High Sierra:*

El Capitan:

* If your Mac is using macOS Sierra or earlier, include the --applicationpath argument and installer path, similar to the way this is done in the command for El Capitan.


After typing the command:

  1. Press Return to enter the command.
  2. When prompted, type your administrator password and press Return again. Terminal doesn't show any characters as you type your password.
  3. When prompted, type Y to confirm that you want to erase the volume, then press Return. Terminal shows the progress as the volume is erased.
  4. After the volume is erased, you may see an alert that Terminal would like to access files on a removable volume. Click OK to allow the copy to proceed.
  5. When Terminal says that it's done, the volume will have the same name as the installer you downloaded, such as Install macOS Big Sur. You can now quit Terminal and eject the volume.

Use the bootable installer

Determine whether you're using a Mac with Apple silicon, then follow the appropriate steps:

Apple silicon

  1. Plug the bootable installer into a Mac that is connected to the internet and compatible with the version of macOS you're installing.
  2. Turn on your Mac and continue to hold the power button until you see the startup options window, which shows your bootable volumes.
  3. Select the volume containing the bootable installer, then click Continue.
  4. When the macOS installer opens, follow the onscreen instructions.

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  1. Plug the bootable installer into a Mac that is connected to the internet and compatible with the version of macOS you're installing.
  2. Press and hold the Option (Alt) ⌥ key immediately after turning on or restarting your Mac.
  3. Release the Option key when you see a dark screen showing your bootable volumes.
  4. Select the volume containing the bootable installer. Then click the up arrow or press Return.
    If you can't start up from the bootable installer, make sure that the External Boot setting in Startup Security Utility is set to allow booting from external media.
  5. Choose your language, if prompted.
  6. Select Install macOS (or Install OS X) from the Utilities window, then click Continue and follow the onscreen instructions.

Learn more

A bootable installer doesn't download macOS from the internet, but it does require an internet connection to get firmware and other information specific to the Mac model.

For information about the createinstallmedia command and the arguments you can use with it, make sure that the macOS installer is in your Applications folder, then enter the appropriate path in Terminal:

Booting from a USB stick is nowadays more and more important. More and more PCs (and servers) are delivered by default without a CD/DVD drive. To install the OS of your choice, USB sticks provide you the easiest possibility. In fact, it can even work out cheaper than burning a CD or DVD that you just throw away once the version is outdated.

For most Linux distributions the ISO for burning a CD/DVD is available freely on the internet. In this post I’ll assume you have already downloaded the bootable ISO image for the OS of your choice, but how to get the ISO image onto the USB stick?

The ISO file you have downloaded contains an image of the entire media. It includes all the files necessary to boot your PC/server. This image format is sadly not directly usable to copy onto the USB stick. We first need to convert the image from an ISO to a UDRW (Read/Write Universal Disk Image Format) which we can copy to the USB stick.

Some of the steps to create a bootable USB stick could be done in the GUI as well, but as some of them can’t and you have to go to the shell anyway, I decided to do all of the steps in the shell.

Convert the ISO to UDRW format

Mac OS X provides all the tools needed to convert the ISO image to UDRW. The following command will convert the ISO image to the UDRW format.

You will notice that the destination_file.img from the command will create the file destination_file.img.dmg really. This is because the hdiutil program automatically adds the dmg file extension. This is not a problem as the file extension won’t affect the format of the image.

Prepare the USB stick

Check your USB stick and make a backup if there is any important data on it, as the next steps are going to delete everything on it.

To prepare the USb stick we are going to delete all the partitions on the stick and create an empty partition. To do this we need to know the device name of the USB stick. Open a terminal and execute the following command:

You will see a list of disks and partitions. The goal is to identify the USB stick in this output. Depending on your system configuration your output might look different from this one. This appears to show 3 physical discs but it does not. The /dev/disk1 is a virtual disk created because of the partition encryption (FileVault 2) I enabled in Mac OS X.

As shown in the output above, the connected USB stick is a small 2.0 GB drive with a FAT partition on it. We are now going to remove this partition in the next step. For the following steps we will need the name of the disk which in this case is “/dev/disk2”.

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With the following command the data on the disk (your USB stick) will be deleted!

With this command the USB stick was re-partitioned to have 1 partition without formatting and 100% of the size of the stick. If you check it again with “diskutil list” you will see the changes already, also the USB stick will no longer be shown in the Finder.

Copy the image to the USB stick

Now we can copy the disk image we created to the USB stick. This is done via the dd(1) command. This command will copy the image to the disk (substitute the appropriate disk name for your USB stick here, as with the re-partitioning command):

The dd command does not show any output before it has finished the copy process, so be patient and wait for it to complete.

Os X Usb Creator For Windows

To eject the USB stick, use the above command. After this is done, the bootable USB stick is ready to be used.

Read more of my posts on my blog at https://blog.tinned-software.net/.

Osx Usb Creator Download

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