Osx Create Zip File

  

More and more people are using Mac’s for development these days. As an example, a lot of the core developers from some of the leadingweb frameworks use Mac as their primary development platform. Several plugin and theme authors for WordPress also develop on Mac. While this is a good thing, there is one particular side effect of this development that annoys me beyond relief.

It seems that the easiest way to archive something on Mac is to right click on your directory of choice in Finder and select “Archive as…”. This creates a Zip file, which then the developer can distribute to users. The problem is that Apple, like many other software giants, tends to twist and bend the user’s will and interpret what the user wants to mean something else. In this case, the natural thing for the OS to do is pack up that directory, and ONLY that directory in a Zip file. But no sir, how can that be? How can Apple “transparently” embed some metadata in the Zip file so that if some other Mac user opens it in Finder, he/she can benefit from this metadata.

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Apple does this by creating another folder suspiciously named ”%%__MACOSX%%” at the root of your Zip archive. Here’s an example (its the Cutline theme):

0 02-02-07 12:37 Cutline 1.1/
12292 01-31-07 17:16 Cutline 1.1/.DS_Store
0 02-02-07 12:38 __MACOSX/
0 02-02-07 12:38 __MACOSX/Cutline 1.1/
82 01-31-07 17:16 __MACOSX/Cutline 1.1/._.DS_Store
82 01-31-07 00:12 __MACOSX/Cutline 1.1/._ie6.css
238 01-30-07 23:59 Cutline 1.1/ie7.css
82 01-30-07 23:59 __MACOSX/Cutline 1.1/._ie7.css
0 09-13-06 17:30 Cutline 1.1/images/
12292 09-13-06 17:30 Cutline 1.1/images/.DS_Store
0 02-02-07 12:38 __MACOSX/Cutline 1.1/images/
82 09-13-06 17:30 __MACOSX/Cutline 1.1/images/._.DS_Store
65705 09-11-06 15:55 Cutline 1.1/images/header_1.jpg
34365 09-11-06 15:55 __MACOSX/Cutline 1.1/images/._header_1.jpg
62867 09-11-06 15:59 Cutline 1.1/images/header_2.jpg
33224 09-11-06 15:59 __MACOSX/Cutline 1.1/images/._header_2.jpg
82708 09-11-06 16:01 Cutline 1.1/images/header_3.jpg
34855 09-11-06 16:01 __MACOSX/Cutline 1.1/images/._header_3.jpg
59780 09-11-06 16:03 Cutline 1.1/images/header_4.jpg
33555 09-11-06 16:03 __MACOSX/Cutline 1.1/images/._header_4.jpg

This folder contains, among other things, thumbnails for images in the original archive. Now, this kind of unwanted, undesirable outcomes just really really annoy me. But I’ll try to keep my cool, and present a systematic analysis of not only why what Mac OSX does is wrong, but also stupid and unnecessary:

  • No surprises: As a user, I don’t like surprises, specially of the bad kind. If I request to archive a directory into a Zip file, thats exactly what I want. If I later unarchive that zip file, I should get my original directory back. Nothing more, nothing less. Any kind of unintended behavior is BAD.
  • We are not stupid: If I wanted you to stick in an extra folder named ”%%__MACOSX%%” in my archive, I’d let you know. Your users are a smart group, don’t insult them like this.
  • I hate clutter: In my WordPress themes directory, I unzip Cutline. If each theme starts creating its own ”%%__MACOSX%%” folder, then my themes directory would soon get cluttered with needless garbage.
  • It breaks things: If MacOSX did something harmless, like embed some metadata (like Zip file creator) into the Zip file itself, I might have been OK. But creating an entire tree structure in the archive just breaks things, in ways more than one. As an example, if like Cutline, each WordPress theme started creating ”%%__MACOSX%%” folders in the root of the archive, then later if I install another theme, I’ll get lots of errors and file name collissions because the new theme will also try to extract in the ”%%__MACOSX%%” folder. Not only this, some programs (like Gallery and WordPress) have the ability to load plugins/images directly from Zip files. As a result, I’ll end up with unwanted images, themes and plugins in my setup. Not only this, it might actually just break your installation. Since you did not create the ”%%__MACOSX%%” folder yourself, you don’t know what is in it, and it might not always obey the expecations of the software.
  • Security: Again, you did not explicitly create that folder. What if someone creates a virus, that just modifies the default zip program on Mac to sneak in malicious payload via the ”%%__MACOSX%%” folders in any new Zip archives you create? Apart from the security risk, its a time sink. Why should I go around cleaning up mess that I did not create? Software is supposed to make my life easier, not harder.
  • Redundant: From the looks of it, it seems that all of the data inside the ”%%__MACOSX%%” folder is created from the original directory. No external information is used/needed. If thats the case, why oh why would anyone EVER need this stupid new folder? If some metadata is needed, it can always be reconstructed from the original on demand. This seems downright stupid to me.

Would someone, anyone, please explain Apple’s intent and motivation behind this “feature”? What are the benefits (if any)?

Disk Utility User Guide

You can use Disk Utility to create a disk image, which is a file that contains other files and folders.

Note: You can burn information to a CD or DVD using the Burn command in the Finder. See Burn CDs and DVDs.

Create a blank disk image for storage

You can create an empty disk image, add data to it, then use it to create disks, CDs, or DVDs.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, choose File > New Image > Blank Image.

  2. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  3. In the Name field, enter the name for the disk image.

    This is the name that appears on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar, after you open the disk image.

  4. In the Size field, enter a size for the disk image.

  5. Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose the format for the disk:

    • If the disk image will be used with a Mac that has a solid state drive (SSD) and uses macOS 10.13 or later, choose APFS or APFS (Case-sensitive).

    • If the disk image will be used with a Mac with macOS 10.12 or earlier, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled) or Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled).

    • If the disk image will be used with a Mac or Windows computer and is 32 GB or less, choose MS-DOS (FAT); if it’s over 32 GB, choose ExFAT.

  6. To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  7. Click the Partitions pop-up menu, then choose a partition layout.

  8. Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:

    • Sparse bundle disk image: Same as a sparse disk image (below), but the directory data for the image is stored differently. Uses the .sparsebundle file extension.

    • Sparse disk image: Creates an expandable file that shrinks and grows as needed. No additional space is used. Uses the .sparseimage file extension.

    • Read/write disk image: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created. Uses the .dmg file extension.

    • DVD/CD master: Changes the size of the image to 177 MB (CD 8 cm). Uses the .cdr file extension.

  9. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

  10. In the Finder, copy your files to the mounted disk image, then eject it.

  11. Restore the disk image to a disk.

    For more information about disk image types, see the manual (man) page for hdiutil.

Create Zip File online, free

Create a disk image from a disk or connected device

You can create a disk image that includes the data and free space on a physical disk or connected device, such as a USB device. For example, if a USB device or volume is 80 GB with 10 GB of data, the disk image will be 80 GB in size and include data and free space. You can then restore that disk image to another volume.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, select a disk, volume, or connected device in the sidebar.

  2. Choose File > New Image, then choose “Image from [device name].”

  3. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  4. Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:

    • Read-only: The disk image can’t be written to, and is quicker to create and open.

    • Compressed: Compresses data, so the disk image is smaller than the original data. The disk image is read-only.

    • Read/write: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created.

    • DVD/CD master: Can be used with third-party apps. It includes a copy of all sectors of the disk image, whether they’re used or not. When you use a master disk image to create other DVDs or CDs, all data is copied exactly.

  5. To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  6. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

Important: Don’t create a disk image of a disk that you believe to be failing or that contains corrupted information. The disk image may not serve as a reliable backup.

For technical information about creating a restore disk image, see the Apple Software Restore (ASR) manual (man) page.

Create a disk image from a folder or connected device

You can create a disk image that contains the contents of a folder or connected device, such as a USB device. This method doesn’t copy a device’s free space to the disk image. For example, if a USB device or volume is 80 GB with 10 GB of data, the disk image will be 10 GB in size and include only data, not free space. You can then restore that disk image to another volume.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, choose File > New Image, then choose Image from Folder.

  2. Select the folder or connected device in the dialog that appears, then click Open.

  3. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  4. To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  5. Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:

    • Read-only: The disk image can’t be written to, and is quicker to create and open.

    • Compressed: Compresses data, so the disk image is smaller than the original data. The disk image is read-only.

    • Read/write: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created.

    • DVD/CD master: Can be used with third-party apps. It includes a copy of all sectors of the disk image, whether they’re used or not. When you use a master disk image to create other DVDs or CDs, all data is copied exactly.

    • Hybrid image (HFS+/ISO/UDF): This disk image is a combination of disk image formats and can be used with different file system standards, such as HFS, ISO, and UDF.

  6. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

For technical information about creating a restore disk image, see the Apple Software Restore (ASR) manual (man) page.

Create a secure disk image

Create

If you have confidential documents that you don’t want others to see without your permission, you can put them in an encrypted disk image.

Note: If you want to protect the contents of the system disk, turn on FileVault using the FileVault pane of Security & Privacy Preferences.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, choose File > New Image > Blank Image.

  2. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  3. In the Name field, enter the name for the disk image.

    This is the name that appears on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar, after you open the disk image.

  4. In the Size field, enter a size for the disk image.

  5. Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose a format:

    • If you’re using the encrypted disk image with a Mac computer using macOS 10.13 or later, choose APFS or APFS (Case-sensitive).

    • If you’re using the encrypted disk image with a Mac computer using macOS 10.12 or earlier, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled) or Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled).

  6. Click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  7. Enter and re-enter a password to unlock the disk image, then click Choose.

    WARNING: If you forget this password, you won’t be able to open the disk image and view any of the files.

  8. Use the default settings for the rest of the options:

    • Click the Partitions pop-up menu, then choose Single partition - GUID Partition Map.

    • Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose “read/write” disk image.

  9. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

  10. In the Finder , copy the documents you want to protect to the disk image.

  11. If you want to erase the original documents so they can’t be recovered, drag them to the Trash, then choose Finder > Empty Trash.

When you’re finished using the documents on the secure disk image, be sure to eject the disk image. As long as it’s available on your desktop, anyone with access to your computer can use the documents on it.

Osx Create Encrypted Zip File

To access the data in a disk image, double-click it. It appears on your desktop, and you can add, remove, and edit files on it just as you would with a disk.

Mac Create Zip File Without Folder

See alsoAdd a checksum to a disk image using Disk Utility on MacVerify that a disk image’s data isn’t corrupted using Disk Utility on MacRestore a disk image to a disk using Disk Utility on MacConvert a disk image to another format using Disk Utility on Mac