Macos High Sierra Security Updates

  

Automatic Mac App updates can be useful. These will automatically run in the background and save you a little time, keeping apps fully up-to-date. But not everyone wants this feature. It can be better to know exactly what you are downloading, even if you’ve been using the same app for a while.

  1. Mac Os High Sierra Security Update Stuck
  2. Macos High Sierra Security Update

MacOS Catalina 10.15.7, Security Update 2020-005 High Sierra, Security Update 2020-005 Mojave: macOS High Sierra 10.13.6, macOS Mojave 10.14.6, macOS Catalina 10.15.6: 24 Sep 2020: iOS 14.0.1 and iPadOS 14.0.1 This update has no published CVE entries. IPhone 6s and later, iPad Air 2 and later, iPad mini 4 and later, and iPod touch (7th generation). For example, in May 2018, the latest release of macOS was macOS 10.13 High Sierra. This release is supported with security updates, and the previous releases—macOS 10.12 Sierra and OS X 10.11 El Capitan—were also supported. When Apple releases macOS 10.14, OS X 10.11 El Capitan will very likely no longer be supported.

In this article, we look at the ways you can prevent automatic app updates on a Mac. There are a few ways you can do this, and apps that can make it quicker and easier to ensure you’ve only got the apps you need running on your Mac.

#1: Change update preferences (macOS Mojave 10.14 and newer)

  1. Go to the  Apple menu
  2. Click on App Store
  3. Now click on Preferences
  4. In this, is a box for Automatic Updates (if checked by default, uncheck the box to disable automatic updates)

In the future, when an app you've downloaded through the Mac App Store has an update coming through, you will be alerted, but it can’t download until you manually confirm it.

Depending on the macOS or older version, Mac OS X that you are running, there are other ways to disable automatic updates. For these, we've covered Mac OS X High Sierra, Sierra, El Capitan, Yosemite, Mavericks in the tip below — as they follow the same process — and older operating systems in another tip further down the article.

#2: Disable automatic updates (For: Mac OS X High Sierra, Sierra, El Capitan, Yosemite, Mavericks)

With older operating systems — Mac OS X High Sierra, Sierra, El Capitan, Yosemite, Mavericks — the process is slightly different from the one listed above for stopping auto app updates.

  1. Go to the  Apple menu
  2. Click on App Store
  3. Now click on Preferences
  4. Uncheck ALL of the following boxes to prevent automatic updates:
  • Automatically check for updates
  • Download newly available updates in the background
  • Install app updates

However, leave the following box enabled (as this is crucial for security): Install system data files and security updates.

#3: Delete Google Automatic updaters and other background agents

With some apps, they update and even work in the background without you being aware.

These are known as background apps, or and with some they have launch agents that activate whenever a Mac is switched on. All of this potentially uses processing power, such as CPU, and even internet bandwidth. Apps shouldn't be working unless you need them and remember agreeing to open them.

Here is how to prevent this from happening:

  1. Download CleanMyMac X (for free, here).
  2. Click on the Optimization module.
  3. There is a Launch Agents tool within this.
  4. Use it to disable automatic updates, notifications and even disable Google Automatic updaters and other background apps and launch agents.

#4: For third-party apps, you can also disable updates within individual app settings

Not everyone downloads apps on a Mac from the Mac App Store.

Mac Os High Sierra Security Update Stuck

In many cases, people get them straight from a developers website, or third-party subscription service.

With these, you need to go into the individual apps, where you should have the option to ensure they automatically update, or to switch this setting off. With these apps, they will be configured to adhere to macOS standards, so these options should come as a normal feature, ensuring they're easy to update, or not, according to what people prefer.

Before we continue, here is a cool Apple fact for you: Have you ever noticed the date shown on created and modified timestamps that have failed to download, or you cancelled or paused during a download?

Take a look. Instead of showing whichever date the download stopped, they show 24 January 1984 — the day Apple founder, Steve Jobs, unveiled the first Apple Macintosh computer to the world.

#5: Another way to keep your software updated

As mentioned above, CleanMyMac X is a great way to prevent automatic updates and remove unwanted background apps. It can also be used in a reverse way — for updating all your applications.

The free version of CleanMyMac X (download it here) comes with an Updater feature to keep all of your updates in one place — whether or not you got them from the Mac App Store. It’s especially handy for 32-bit apps that will no longer work on the 2019 macOS Catalina. But if there are newer, 64-bit versions of these apps already available, the Updater in CleanMyMac X will suggest to automatically update your Mac.
It is also useful for keeping your Mac free from viruses and other problems that can cause a Mac to slow down. Get your Mac running as good as new, and make sure you’re only downloading the apps you definitely need.

About Apple security updates

For our customers' protection, Apple doesn't disclose, discuss, or confirm security issues until an investigation has occurred and patches or releases are available. Recent releases are listed on the Apple security updates page.

For more information about security, see the Apple Product Security page. You can encrypt communications with Apple using the Apple Product Security PGP Key.

Apple security documents reference vulnerabilities by CVE-ID when possible.

macOS High Sierra 10.13.6, Security Update 2018-004 Sierra, Security Update 2018-004 El Capitan

Released July 9, 2018

Accounts

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: A malicious application may be able to access local users AppleIDs

Description: A privacy issue in the handling of Open Directory records was addressed with improved indexing.

CVE-2018-4470: Jacob Greenfield of Commonwealth School

Entry added December 10, 2018

AMD

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: A malicious application may be able to determine kernel memory layout

Description: An information disclosure issue was addressed by removing the vulnerable code.

CVE-2018-4289: shrek_wzw of Qihoo 360 Nirvan Team

APFS

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: An application may be able to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges

Description: A memory corruption issue was addressed with improved memory handling.

CVE-2018-4268: Mac working with Trend Micro's Zero Day Initiative

ATS

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: A malicious application may be able to gain root privileges

Description: A type confusion issue was addressed with improved memory handling.

CVE-2018-4285: Mohamed Ghannam (@_simo36)

Bluetooth

Macos high sierra security update download

Available for: MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2018) and MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2018, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
Other Mac models were addressed with macOS High Sierra 10.13.5.

Impact: An attacker in a privileged network position may be able to intercept Bluetooth traffic

Description: An input validation issue existed in Bluetooth. This issue was addressed with improved input validation.

CVE-2018-5383: Lior Neumann and Eli Biham

Entry added July 23, 2018

CFNetwork

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: Cookies may unexpectedly persist in Safari

Description: A cookie management issue was addressed with improved checks.

CVE-2018-4293: an anonymous researcher

CoreCrypto

Available for: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6, macOS Sierra 10.12.6

Impact: A malicious application may be able to break out of its sandbox

Description: A memory corruption issue was addressed with improved input validation.

CVE-2018-4269: Abraham Masri (@cheesecakeufo)

CUPS

Available for: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6, macOS Sierra 10.12.6, macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: An attacker in a privileged position may be able to perform a denial of service attack

Description: A null pointer dereference was addressed with improved validation.

CVE-2018-4276: Jakub Jirasek of Secunia Research at Flexera

Entry added September 25, 2018

DesktopServices

Available for: macOS Sierra 10.12.6

Impact: A local user may be able to view sensitive user information

Description: A permissions issue existed in which execute permission was incorrectly granted. This issue was addressed with improved permission validation.

CVE-2018-4178: Arjen Hendrikse

Intel Graphics Driver

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: An application may be able to execute arbitrary code with kernel privileges

Description: A memory corruption issue was addressed with improved input validation.

CVE-2018-4456: Tyler Bohan of Cisco Talos

Entry updated January 22, 2019

IOGraphics

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: A local user may be able to read kernel memory

Description: An out-of-bounds read issue existed that led to the disclosure of kernel memory. This was addressed with improved input validation.

CVE-2018-4283: @panicaII working with Trend Micro's Zero Day Initiative

Kernel

Available for: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6, macOS Sierra 10.12.6, macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: Systems using Intel® Core-based microprocessors may potentially allow a local process to infer data utilizing Lazy FP state restore from another process through a speculative execution side channel

Description: Lazy FP state restore instead of eager save and restore of the state upon a context switch. Lazy restored states are potentially vulnerable to exploits where one process may infer register values of other processes through a speculative execution side channel that infers their value.

An information disclosure issue was addressed with FP/SIMD register state sanitization.

CVE-2018-3665: Julian Stecklina of Amazon Germany, Thomas Prescher of Cyberus Technology GmbH (cyberus-technology.de), Zdenek Sojka of SYSGO AG (sysgo.com), and Colin Percival

Kernel

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: Mounting a maliciously crafted NFS network share may lead to arbitrary code execution with system privileges

Description: Multiple memory corruption issues were addressed with improved memory handling.

CVE-2018-4259: Kevin Backhouse of Semmle and LGTM.com

CVE-2018-4286: Kevin Backhouse of Semmle and LGTM.com

CVE-2018-4287: Kevin Backhouse of Semmle and LGTM.com

CVE-2018-4288: Kevin Backhouse of Semmle and LGTM.com

CVE-2018-4291: Kevin Backhouse of Semmle and LGTM.com

Entry added October 30, 2018

libxpc

Available for: OS X El Capitan 10.11.6, macOS Sierra 10.12.6, macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: An application may be able to gain elevated privileges

Description: A memory corruption issue was addressed with improved memory handling.

CVE-2018-4280: Brandon Azad

libxpc

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Update

Impact: A malicious application may be able to read restricted memory

Description: An out-of-bounds read was addressed with improved input validation.

CVE-2018-4248: Brandon Azad

LinkPresentation

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: Visiting a malicious website may lead to address bar spoofing

Description: A spoofing issue existed in the handling of URLs. This issue was addressed with improved input validation.

CVE-2018-4277: xisigr of Tencent's Xuanwu Lab (tencent.com)

Perl

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: Multiple buffer overflow issues existed in Perl

Description: Multiple issues in Perl were addressed with improved memory handling.

CVE-2018-6797: Brian Carpenter

CVE-2018-6913: GwanYeong Kim

Entry added October 30, 2018

Ruby

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: A remote attacker may be able to cause unexpected application termination or arbitrary code execution

Description: Multiple issues in Ruby were addressed in this update.

CVE-2017-0898

CVE-2017-10784

CVE-2017-14033

CVE-2017-14064

CVE-2017-17405

CVE-2017-17742

CVE-2018-6914

CVE-2018-8777

CVE-2018-8778

CVE-2018-8779

CVE-2018-8780

Entry added October 30, 2018

WebKit

Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.5

Impact: Visiting a malicious website may lead to address bar spoofing

Description: A spoofing issue existed in the handling of URLs. This issue was addressed with improved input validation.

CVE-2018-4274: Tomasz Bojarski

Entry added July 28, 2020

Additional recognition

App Store

We would like to acknowledge Jesse Endahl & Stevie Hryciw of Fleetsmith, and Max Bélanger of Dropbox for their assistance.

Entry added August 8, 2018

Help Viewer

We would like to acknowledge Wojciech Reguła (@_r3ggi) of SecuRing for their assistance with four mitigations.

Kernel

We would like to acknowledge juwei lin (@panicaII) of Trend Micro working with Trend Micro’s Zero Day Initiative for their assistance.

Security

Macos High Sierra Security Update

We would like to acknowledge Brad Dahlsten of Iowa State University for their assistance.