Jre Mac Os X

  

I need to test a web application with JRE 6. I am using a Mac with OS X 10.10 and Java 7 for development. How can I install JRE 6 next to Java 7 on this Mac? This previous answer does not yet account for the fact (also mentioned in a comment) that Apple's download link by now points to a.pkg (Java for OS X 2014-001) file. Mac OS X and Apple Java 6 End of Life. Apple has posted notice that Mac OS X 10.11 (El Capitan) will be the last OS X release that supports Java 6, and as such, recommends developers whose applications depend on Java 6 to migrate their apps to a newer Java version provided by Oracle. » More info (apple.com) Can I use Chrome with Oracle Java on. Os X Yosemite Mac Dmg Cool Dmg Pallette To Play Pokemon In Jdk Dmg File Jdk-10.interim.update.patch-macosx-x64.dmg Necrodancer Boot Do Dmg As You Walk Amd Radeon Pro 570 Drivers Mac Dmg Dnd 5e Dmg Gold Rolling What Is A Dmg File Type Descargar Mac Os X El Capitan Dmg Mega Dmg Eyes Of The Eagle 5e 10.9 Mac Os Dmg. The following steps show you how to install a non-notarized JDK or JRE. Note: These steps use the JDK 8u231 macOS installer as an example. These steps apply equally to all other JDK and JRE releases. Installing the JDK Using a.dmg File. Double-click on the.dmg file to begin the installation.

Links are provided below to the various versions of OmegaT. Ifyou are confused about which version to download, you can use the Download selector.

The version for installation by the user, familiar to existing OmegaT users. If in doubt, select this version.

The Web Start version is the 'install and forget' version.
The benefit: once launched, future updates of the Web Start version will be installed automatically on your computer.
The drawback: at present, this version cannot be used in conjunction with plug-ins, so not all functions are available.

For installation on Mac OS X.

For installation on other operating systems (such as FreeBSD and Solaris).
OmegaT can be installed on any operating system capable of running version 1.8 of the Java runtime environment.

The 'batteries included' version of OmegaT, with its own Java Runtime Environment. This version will take longer to download and will require more space on your hard drive, but you can be confident that it will run. If in doubt, select this option.

The included JRE is the 64-bit version.

The 'batteries included' version of OmegaT, with its own Java Runtime Environment. This version will take longer to download and will require more space on your hard drive, but you can be confident that it will run. If in doubt, select this option.

If you are sure that a suitable Java Runtime Environment is already installed on your computer at system level, you can select the option without JRE included.

Mac os x download

The 'Standard' version of OmegaT includes a full user manual (at least in English) and will usually have been tested for some time to eliminate any bugs. It is the recommended version for first-time users.

As its name suggests, the 'Latest' version of Omegat is more up to date. However, the user manual may no longer be up to date (and therefore possibly confusing), and some minor bugs are possible. Nevertheless, the 'Latest' versions of OmegaT are usually very stable and are recommended for any users who already have some experience with OmegaT.

Requirements

System requirements

OmegaT will run on any system on which the appropriate JRE (Java Runtime Environment)has been or can be installed. The JRE is now supplied with OmegaT and need notbe obtained separately. OmegaT has been successfully installed on Windows (allversions from 98 onwards), Macintosh OS X and Linux.

Files in Microsoft Office XML format can be translated directly in OmegaT.Files in older MS Word, Excel and Powerpoint formats can be translatedfollowing conversion to the equivalent current Microsoft Office formats, oralternatively to the Office Open XML format, which can be done inOpenOffice.org or LibreOffice (also free). To obtain OpenOffice.org orLibreOffice, follow the link from 'Third-party software' button on theleft.

User requirements

OmegaT is not particularly difficult to install or use, but it does requirea willingness to read and follow the instructions. If you have a naturalaversion to reading instructions, and your approach to new software is to clickon every button you see until something resembling the desired effect occurs,then OmegaT is probably not suitable for you.

Before proceeding

Have you considered donating to OmegaT? Even though this software is free, if you find OmegaT useful and would like to express your gratitude, you can make a donation on our Paypal account.

Standard Version - OmegaT 4.3.2

The Standard version requires Java 8. It has usually been in use for some time and is thereforeproven. Its documentation, at least in English, is usually reasonably up todate.

PlatformDetailed instructions
Windows with JREDownload
Windows with 64-bit JREDownload
Windows without JREDownload
macOS NotarizedDownload
macOS UnsignedDownload
Linux with 64-bit JREDownload
Linux with JREDownload
Cross-platform without JREDownload
Web StartDownload
Source codeDownload

Latest Version - OmegaT 5.6.0

The Latest version requires Java 8. It is a more recent version than the Standard version andincludes new features not present in the latter. The Latest version willusually be reasonably stable and usable, but may have some bugs. Documentation,particularly of new features, will be less comprehensive than that of theStandard version. Users who already have some experience with OmegaT oftenprefer the Latest version.

PlatformDetailed instructions
Windows with JREDownload
Windows with 64-bit JREDownload
Windows without JREDownload
macOS NotarizedDownload
macOS UnsignedDownload
Linux with 64-bit JREDownload
Cross-platform without JREDownload
Web StartDownload
Source codeDownload

Developer Version

The 'master' version is a cutting-edge, 'alpha' version, still indevelopment. Pre-built binaries, are available as Nightly Builds.

PlatformDetailed instructions
MasterDownload
Nightly BuildsDownload

Legacy versions

You can still find older, superseded versions of OmegaT.

Legacy versions are older versions that have been superseded. For mostusers, these are not of interest. However, some users may face restrictions(imposed by their operating systems or Java version) that may result in apreference for an older version.

With/without JRE

In order to run, OmegaT requires the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) to be installed on your computer.

If you are confident that a suitable version of the JRE is already installed on your computer, you can download a version of OmegaT without the JRE. The download will be faster, and the installation will require lessspace on your hard drive. In this case, do not select the Default version; select a different version (e.g. Standard or Latest), then select a version marked 'Java not included'.

If you install the OmegaT version with JRE even though the JRE is already installed on your computer, OmegaT's JRE will be installed separately and will not conflict with it. It is therefore always safe to install the version of OmegaT with JRE. If you are unsure whether or not you have a suitable version of the JRE, select a version with JRE (or the Default version).

Linux users: most Linux distributions are supplied with a Java Runtime Environment, but some open-source implementations do not work properly with OmegaT (although this may not be immediately apparent). If you are relatively new to Linux, we advise you to select an OmegaT version with the JRE included. More experienced Linux users may prefer to install the Oracle (formerly Sun) JRE at system level.

JDK 8 and JRE 8 Supported Locales

The set of supported locales varies between different implementations of the Java Platform Standard Edition (Java SE) as well as between different areas of functionality.

This page documents locale support in Oracle's Java SE Development Kit 8 (JDK) and Java SE Runtime Environment 8 (JRE).

  • Enabled Locales for java.util and java.text Functionality
  • Enabled Writing Systems for Java Foundation Classes

Installer and Supported Languages

The JRE and JDK Installers are localized to the languages specified in the User Interface Translation table. The installers will use the use the system's default locale setting to determine which of the supported languages to use at the time of installation. If the system's default locale is not supported by the installer, the installer will be displayed in English.

The complete international version of the JRE is installed.

Enabled Locales for java.util and java.text Functionality

The support for locale-sensitive behavior in the java.util and java.text packages is almost entirely platform independent, so all locales are supported in the same way and simultaneously, independent of the host operating system and its localization. The only platform dependent functionality is the setting of the initial default locale and the initial default time zone based on the host operating system's locale and time zone.

Oracle's JDK 8 and the JRE 8 support all the locales shown below.

Supported Locales

Language (ISO 639)Country (ISO 3166)VariantScript (ISO 15924)Language TagNote
Albanian (sq)Albania (AL)(Latn)sq-AL
Arabic (ar)Algeria (DZ)(Arab)ar-DZ
Arabic (ar)Bahrain (BH)(Arab)ar-BH
Arabic (ar)Egypt (EG)(Arab)ar-EG
Arabic (ar)Iraq (IQ)(Arab)ar-IQ
Arabic (ar)Jordan (JO)(Arab)ar-JO
Arabic (ar)Kuwait (KW)(Arab)ar-KW
Arabic (ar)Lebanon (LB)(Arab)ar-LB
Arabic (ar)Libya (LY)(Arab)ar-LY
Arabic (ar)Morocco (MA)(Arab)ar-MA
Arabic (ar)Oman (OM)(Arab)ar-OM
Arabic (ar)Qatar (QA)(Arab)ar-QA
Arabic (ar)Saudi Arabia (SA)(Arab)ar-SA
Arabic (ar)Sudan (SD)(Arab)ar-SD
Arabic (ar)Syria (SY)(Arab)ar-SY
Arabic (ar)Tunisia (TN)(Arab)ar-TN
Arabic (ar)United Arab Emirates (AE)(Arab)ar-AE
Arabic (ar)Yemen (YE)(Arab)ar-YE
Belarusian (be)Belarus (BY)(Cyrl)be-BY
Bulgarian (bg)Bulgaria (BG)(Cyrl)bg-BG
Catalan (ca)Spain (ES)(Latn)ca-ES
Chinese (zh)China (CN)(Hans)zh-CN
Chinese (zh)Singapore (SG)(Hans)zh-SG(*)
Chinese (zh)Hong Kong (HK)(Hant)zh-HK
Chinese (zh)Taiwan (TW)(Hant)zh-TW
Croatian (hr)Croatia (HR)(Latn)hr-HR
Czech (cs)Czech Republic (CZ)(Latn)cs-CZ
Danish (da)Denmark (DK)(Latn)da-DK
Dutch (nl)Belgium (BE)(Latn)nl-BE
Dutch (nl)Netherlands (NL)(Latn)nl-NL
English (en)Australia (AU)(Latn)en-AU
English (en)Canada (CA)(Latn)en-CA
English (en)India (IN)(Latn)en-IN
English (en)Ireland (IE)(Latn)en-IE
English (en)Malta (MT)(Latn)en-MT(*)
English (en)New Zealand (NZ)(Latn)en-NZ
English (en)Philippines (PH)(Latn)en-PH(*)
English (en)Singapore (SG)(Latn)en-SG(*)
English (en)South Africa (ZA)(Latn)en-ZA
English (en)United Kingdom (GB)(Latn)en-GB
English (en)United States (US)(Latn)en-US
Estonian (et)Estonia (EE)(Latn)et-EE
Finnish (fi)Finland (FI)(Latn)fi-FI
French (fr)Belgium (BE)(Latn)fr-BE
French (fr)Canada (CA)(Latn)fr-CA
French (fr)France (FR)(Latn)fr-FR
French (fr)Luxembourg (LU)(Latn)fr-LU
French (fr)Switzerland (CH)(Latn)fr-CH
German (de)Austria (AT)(Latn)de-AT
German (de)Germany (DE)(Latn)de-DE
German (de)Luxembourg (LU)(Latn)de-LU
German (de)Switzerland (CH)(Latn)de-CH
Greek (el)Cyprus (CY)(Grek)el-CY(*)
Greek (el)Greece (GR)(Grek)el-GR
Hebrew (iw)Israel (IL)(Hebr)iw-IL
Hindi (hi)India (IN)(Deva)hi-INImplicitly specifies the Devanagari numbering system.
Hungarian (hu)Hungary (HU)(Latn)hu-HU
Icelandic (is)Iceland (IS)(Latn)is-IS
Indonesian (in)Indonesia (ID)(Latn)in-ID(*)
Irish (ga)Ireland (IE)(Latn)ga-IE(*)
Italian (it)Italy (IT)(Latn)it-IT
Italian (it)Switzerland (CH)(Latn)it-CH
Japanese (ja)Japan (JP)(Jpan)ja-JP
Japanese (ja)Japan (JP)*(Jpan)ja-JP-u-ca-japaneseExplicitly specifies the Japanese imperial calendar with java.util.Calendar.
Japanese (ja)Japan (JP)JP(Jpan)ja-JP-x-lvariant-JPExplicitly specifies the Japanese imperial calendar with java.util.Calendar. (For compatibility)
Korean (ko)South Korea (KR)(Kore)ko-KR
Latvian (lv)Latvia (LV)(Latn)lv-LV
Lithuanian (lt)Lithuania (LT)(Latn)lt-LT
Macedonian (mk)Macedonia (MK)(Cyrl)mk-MK
Malay (ms)Malaysia (MY)(Latn)ms-MY(*)
Maltese (mt)Malta (MT)(Latn)mt-MT(*)
Norwegian (no)Norway (NO)(Latn)no-NO“no” is treated as Norwegian Bokmål.
Norwegian Bokmål (nb)Norway (NO)(Latn)nb-NO
Norwegian Nynorsk (nn)Norway (NO)(Latn)nn-NO
Norwegian (no)Norway (NO)NY(Latn)no-NO-x-lvariant-NY“no” is treated as Norwegian Nynorsk. (For compatibility)
Polish (pl)Poland (PL)(Latn)pl-PL
Portuguese (pt)Brazil (BR)(Latn)pt-BR(***)
Portuguese (pt)Portugal (PT)(Latn)pt-PT(***)
Romanian (ro)Romania (RO)(Latn)ro-RO
Russian (ru)Russia (RU)(Cyrl)ru-RU
Serbian (sr)Bosnia and Herzegovina (BA)(Cyrl)sr-BA(*)
Serbian (sr)Montenegro (ME)(Cyrl)sr-ME(*)
Serbian (sr)Serbia (RS)(Cyrl)sr-RS(*)
Serbian (sr)Bosnia and Herzegovina (BA)Latnsr-Latn-BA(**)
Serbian (sr)Montenegro (ME)Latnsr-Latn-ME(**)
Serbian (sr)Serbia (RS)Latnsr-Latn-RS(**)
Slovak (sk)Slovakia (SK)(Latn)sk-SK
Slovenian (sl)Slovenia (SI)(Latn)sl-SI
Spanish (es)Argentina (AR)(Latn)es-AR
Spanish (es)Bolivia (BO)(Latn)es-BO
Spanish (es)Chile (CL)(Latn)es-CL
Spanish (es)Colombia (CO)(Latn)es-CO
Spanish (es)Costa Rica (CR)(Latn)es-CR
Spanish (es)Dominican Republic (DO)(Latn)es-DO
Spanish (es)Ecuador (EC)(Latn)es-EC
Spanish (es)El Salvador (SV)(Latn)es-SV
Spanish (es)Guatemala (GT)(Latn)es-GT
Spanish (es)Honduras (HN)(Latn)es-HN
Spanish (es)Mexico (MX)(Latn)es-MX
Spanish (es)Nicaragua (NL)(Latn)es-NI
Spanish (es)Panama (PA)(Latn)es-PA
Spanish (es)Paraguay (PY)(Latn)es-PY
Spanish (es)Peru (PE)(Latn)es-PE
Spanish (es)Puerto Rico (PR)(Latn)es-PR
Spanish (es)Spain (ES)(Latn)es-ES
Spanish (es)United States (US)(Latn)es-US(*)
Spanish (es)Uruguay (UY)(Latn)es-UY
Spanish (es)Venezuela (VE)(Latn)es-VE
Swedish (sv)Sweden (SE)(Latn)sv-SE
Thai (th)Thailand (TH)(Thai)th-THImplicitly specifies the Latin numbering system and the Thai Buddhist calendar with java.util.Calendar.
Thai (th)Thailand (TH)*(Thai)th-TH-u-ca-buddhistImplicitly specifies the Latin numbering system. Explicitly specifies the Thai Buddhist calendar with java.util.Calendar.
Thai (th)Thailand (TH)*(Thai)th-TH-u-ca-buddhist-nu-thaiExplicitly specifies the Thai numbering system and the Thai Buddhist calendar with java.util.Calendar.
Thai (th)Thailand (TH)TH(Thai)th-TH-x-lvariant-THExplicitly specifies the Thai numbering system and the Thai Buddhist calendar with java.util.Calendar. (For compatibility)
Turkish (tr)Turkey (TR)(Latn)tr-TR
Ukrainian (uk)Ukraine (UA)(Cyrl)uk-UA
Vietnamese (vi)Vietnam (VN)(Latn)vi-VN

(*) Data for these locales are derived from the Unicode Consortium's Common Locale Data Repository release 1.4.1 on an 'AS-IS' basis.

(**) Data for these locales are derived from the Unicode Consortium's Common Locale Data Repository release 1.9 on an 'AS-IS' basis.

(***) Data for these locales are derived from the Unicode Consortium's Common Locale Data Repository release 21.0.1 on an 'AS-IS' basis.

Implicit default scripts are in parentheses. They are not returned from the Locale.getScript() method.

Locales can be constructed with Locale.forLanguageTag(<Language Tag>) or Locale(<Language>, <Country>[, <Variant>]) where <Language Tag> is the Language Tag column value, <Language> is the ISO 639 value, <Country> is the ISO 3166 value, and <Variant> is the Variant column value if it’s neither empty nor *.

Locales can be constructed only with Locale.forLanguageTag(<Language Tag>) if the Variant column value is *.

Numbering Systems

Numbering systems can be specified by a language tag with a numbering system ID, such as th-TH-u-nu-thai. The following are the available numbering system IDs for specifying a numbering system. No algorithmic numbering systems defined in Unicode Locale Data Markup Language (LDML) are supported.

Numbering System IDNumbering SystemDigit Zero Value
arabArabic-Indic Digitsu0660
arabextExtended Arabic-Indic Digitsu06f0
baliBalinese Digitsu1b50
bengBengali Digitsu09e6
chamCham Digitsuaa50
devaDevanagari Digitsu0996
fullwideFull Width Digitsuff10
gujrGujarati Digitsu0ae6
guruGurmukhi Digitsu0a66
javaJavanese Digitsua9d0
kaliKayah Li Digitsua900
khmrKhmer Digitsu17e0
kndaKannada Digitsu0ce0
lanaTai Tham Hora Digitsu1a80
lanathamTai Tham Tham Digitsu1a90
laooLao Digitsu0ed0
latnWestern Digitsu0030
lepcLepcha Digitsu1c40
limbLimbu Digitsu1946
mlymMalayalam Digitsu0d66
mongMongolian Digitsu1810
mteiMeetei Mayek Digitsuabf0
mymrMyanmar Digitsu1040
mymrshanMyanmar Shan Digitsu1090
nkooN'Ko Digitsu07c0
olckOl Chiki Digitsu1c50
oryaOriya Digitsu0b66
saurSaurashtra Digitsua8d0
sundSundanese Digitsu1bb0
taluTelugu Digitsu19d0
tamldecTamil Digitsu0be6
teluTelugu Digitsu0c66
thaiThai Digitsu0e50
tibtTibetan Digitsu0f20
vaiiVai Digitsua620

Locales available from other Providers

In addition to the locales that Oracle's JDK 8 and the JRE 8 provide by default, which is represented by “JRE” as the locale provider name, locales from other locale providers can be used. They can be enabled through “java.locale.providers” system property. Refer to java.util.spi.LocaleServiceProvider class’ class description for more detail. Oracle's JDK 8 and the JRE 8 bundle two extra locale providers as follows:

CLDR: CLDR locales based on the Unicode Consortium’s CLDR release 21.0.1. BreakIterator and Collator data are not adopted.

HOST: This provider enables the default locale(s) (Locale.Category.FORMAT and/or Locale.Category.DISPLAY) utilizing the underlying operating system. This provider is available on Windows platform and Mac OS X platform.

The default “JRE” locale provider’s resources for the Locale.ROOT locale are used if none of the specified locale providers support the requested locale. For example, if only “CLDR” is specified in “java.locale.providers” system property, Collator works as if requested for the ROOT locale because “CLDR” locale provider does not provide Collator locale data. Specifying “CLDR,JRE” supplements the “JRE” locale provider’s Collator functionality, as well as preferring “CLDR” locale provider’s other locale data to “JRE”’s ones.

Enabled Writing Systems for Java Foundation Classes and JavaFX

Overview

For the Java Foundation Classes (AWT, Swing, 2D, input method framework, drag and drop) and JavaFX, locales can generally be characterized by just the writing system; there are no country or language specific distinctions. Writing system support in the JFC/JavaFX depends to some extent on the host operating system, and full support for simultaneous use of multiple languages is not always possible.

We consider a writing system supported by JFC/JavaFX if all functionality provided by JFC/JavaFX works adequately for this writing system in the following situations:

  • On Windows Vista, 7, and 8, when running on a Windows system with UI Language set to a language using that writing system.
  • On Solaris and Linux, when running on a host operating system with the locale set to one using that writing system and one of the encodings shown for that writing system in the table below.
  • On Mac OS X, when running with the Language set to one using that writing system and one of the encodings shown for that writing system in the table below.

Oracle's JDK 8 and the JRE 8 support all writing systems shown below. Peered AWT components are only supported for a subset of the writing systems - see the last column.

Details on various areas of functionality are provided in the sections below.

Supported Writing Systems

Writing SystemLanguagesWindows EncodingsSolaris EncodingsLinux EncodingsMac OS X EncodingsPeered AWT Components
ArabicArabic12568859-6,

UTF-8

UTF-8UTF-8unsupported
Chinese (Simplified)Chinese936,

GB18030

gb2312,

UTF-8,

GBK,

gb18030

GB18030,

UTF-8

UTF-8supported
Chinese (Traditional)Chinese950,

HKSCS

cns11643,

UTF-8,

BIG5,

BIG5HK

UTF-8UTF-8supported
CyrillicBelarusian, Russian etc.12518859-5,

KOI8-R,

ANSI1251,

UTF-8

UTF-8UTF-8supported
DevanagariHindiUTF-8UTF-8unsupportedUTF-8unsupported
GreekGreek12538859-7unsupportedUTF-8supported
HebrewHebrew12558859-8UTF-8UTF-8unsupported
JapaneseJapanese932eucJP(1),

UTF-8,

PCK

UTF-8UTF-8supported
KoreanKorean9495601,

UTF-8

UTF-8UTF-8supported
Latin - Baltic subsetLatvian, Lithuanian12578859-13unsupportedUTF-8supported
Latin - Central European subsetCzech, Hungarian, Polish, etc.12508859-2,

UTF-8

unsupportedUTF-8supported
Latin - Maltese subsetMalteseUTF-8UTF-8unsupportedUTF-8supported
Latin - Turkic subsetTurkish etc.12548859-9,

UTF-8

unsupportedUTF-8supported
Latin - Western European subsetEnglish, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Swedish, etc.12528859-1,

8859-15,

UTF-8

ISO-8859-1,

UTF-8

UTF-8supported
ThaiThai874TIS620.2533,

UTF-8

unsupportedUTF-8unsupported

(1) eucJP on Solaris supports the JIS character sets X 0201, X 0208, and X 0212.

Text Input

Support for text input consists of two parts: interpretation of keyboard layouts, and text composition using input methods. For interpretation of keyboard layouts, the JDK relies entirely on the host operating system. For text composition using input methods, JDK supports native input methods using the host operating system's input method manager as well as input methods developed in the Java programming language (excluding JavaFX environment).

Locale support in input methods implemented in the Java programming language depends solely on the set of installed input methods, not on the host operating system and its localization. However, support for the use of input methods implemented in the Java programming language with peered components is implementation dependent - see below.

Support for keyboard layouts and and native input methods varies between platforms.

Windows

On Windows Vista, 7, and 8, the JRE supports use of any keyboard layout or IMM-based input method.

Input methods implemented in the Java programming language are supported in all components but JavaFX nodes, on all versions of Windows.

Solaris and Linux

The JRE supports use of any keyboard layout or input method that can be used with a particular Solaris or Linux locale.

Input methods implemented in the Java programming language are supported in lightweight components (such as Swing text components), but not in peered components (such as AWT text components) or JavaFX nodes.

Mac OS X

The JRE supports use of any input source.

Input methods implemented in the Java programming language are supported in lightweight components (such as Swing text components), but not in peered components (such as AWT text components) or JavaFX nodes.

Jre Macos M1

Text Rendering

Applications have two options for selecting fonts:

Mac Os X Download For Windows

  • Using the logical font names Serif, SansSerif, Dialog, DialogInput, Monospaced.
  • Using a physical font, requesting it by name.

Text Rendering in Lightweight Components

When using logical font names, text in at least the writing system of the host locale and the Western European subset of the Latin writing system is supported.

When using physical fonts, we need to distinguish between simple and complex writing systems. Simple writing systems have a one-to-one mapping from characters to glyphs, and glyphs are placed on the baseline continuously from left to right. Complex writing systems may use different glyphs for the same character based on context, may form ligatures, may be written from right to left, and may reorder glyphs during line layout, or may have other rules for placing glyphs (in particular for combining marks).

The 2D text rendering system supports any combination of simple writing systems and the complex writing systems listed in the table above. Within these limitations, the range of supported writing systems is determined by the font. A single TrueType font might provide glyphs covering the entire Unicode character set and a Unicode based character-to-glyph mapping. Given such a font, 2D can support all simple writing systems as well as the complex writing systems shown in the table above. Other complex writing systems are not supported.

Text Rendering in JavaFX

No precise list of supported font rendering locales can be provided since support is largely dependent on the installed platform fonts, and the complex text rendering capabilities of the native platform. However in general this means the capabilities of JavaFX should be similar to those of the platform itself, and for the supported modern desktop platforms this should match or exceed those of the equivalent JFC/Swing text rendering.

The automatic implicit addition of fallback fonts to all FX fonts other than application embedded fonts means that the application should benefit from the broadest locale support no matter which FX font is in use.

Text Rendering in Peered Components

When using logical font names, text in at least the writing system of the host operating system's locale is supported.

Physical fonts are not supported in peered components.

Text Rendering in Printing

There are three printing APIs:

  • The 2D printing API, using the java.awt.print.PrinterJob.getPrinterJob method.
  • The AWT printing API, using the java.awt.Toolkit.getPrintJob method.
  • The pluggable services printing API, using the javax.print package.

Text rendering using the AWT and 2D printing API works to the same extent as text rendering on the screen. Text rendering using the pluggable services printing API depends on the printing service used; the services provided by the JRE work to the same extent as text rendering on the screen.

Drag and Drop

On Windows Vista, 7, and 8, text using the entire Unicode character set can be transferred between applications.

On Solaris and Linux, text in the character encoding of the host operating system's locale can be transferred between applications.

Applications that need to transfer arbitrary text independent of the host operating system, can do so using serialization: Create a Transferable which supports only one flavor: DataFlavor.stringFlavor. This flavor represents the serialized representation of a String. Make sure that the target supports stringFlavor as well. When the transfer occurs, the AWT will serialize out the String on one end and deserialize on the other. This is much slower than a native platform text transfer, but it will succeed where native transfers may not.

User Interface Translation

JRE

The user interface elements provided by the JRE 8, include Swing dialogs, messages written by the runtime environment to the standard output and standard error streams, as well as messages produced by the tools provided with the JRE. These languages are also supported in JavaFX. These user interface elements are localized into the following languages:

LanguageLocale ID
Chinese (Simplified)zh_CN
Chinese (Traditional)zh_TW
Englishen
Frenchfr
Germande
Italianit
Japaneseja
Koreanko
Portuguese (Brazilian)pt_BR
Spanishes
Swedishsv

JDK

The user interface elements provided by the JDK 8, include messages produced by the tools that are only part of the JDK in addition to the elements provided by the JRE. These languages are also supported in JavaFX. The additional user interface elements are localized into the following languages:

LanguageLocale ID
Chinese (Simplified)zh_CN
Englishen
Japaneseja